Dear People: World War II Letters From My Dad

Dear People-1Dear People-2Dear People-3Dear People-4Dear People-5Dear People-6Dear People-7Dear People-8Dear People-9Dear People-10Dear People-11Dear People-12Dear People-13Dear People-14Dear People-15Dear People-16Dear People-17

About Susan Spangler

I'm a graphic designer & illustrator, observer and survivor. My website, www.susanspangler.com, contains a wide portfolio of my projects and images – some for pay, most for love, many for both. This blog, like most of my artwork, is inspired by things that catch my eye, my ear, my heart. Funny, confounding, astounding and encouraging, all at once. You know. Life.
This entry was posted in #father, family, generations, inspiration, World War II and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

11 Responses to Dear People: World War II Letters From My Dad

  1. Patty Dann says:

    What a sensitive and wonderful writer your father was. It’s amazing to read this and wonderful to see your terrific illustrations!

    • Thanks so much, Patty. Knowing how sensitive he was add exponentially to my admiration of his bravery – his violin-trained fingers tapping Morse coded-messages as murderous flak exploded outside his window.

  2. Barbara Scheiber says:

    Walt’s words and your pictures are so alive — they
    flow together right to my heart! Thank you!!

  3. My heart was heavy with the fear they must have had. The feeling he expressed when seeing the cliffs of England brought tears to my eyes. What courage….and relief. Thanks for making this letter and his written experience available to all.

  4. Valerie Tate says:

    Thank you, Susie. Powerful and beautiful.

  5. Judy says:

    Another wonderful blog entry, Susie! Such a moving way for you to share with us the amazing discovery of your Dad’s letters from his military tour of duty. Like him, my father never would talk to us kids about his time in the service, and we always wondered.

  6. Thanks so much, Judy. Do you know where your dad was stationed and any general information about what he did? The reason I ask is that, in the process of working on this piece, I discovered a wealth of information about Dad’s plane, his job, and his squadron – even a site that listed everyone in his bombardment group by name, rank and responsibility. It opened my eyes to so much detail that even his letters didn’t include.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s